Cancer-related Surgery Procedures

Women's Health Procedure's Cancer Related Surgery Procedures General Surgery Procedures

Robotic Surgery for Prostate Cancer:

da Vinci Prostatectomy

Facing any kind of urologic surgery creates a great deal of anxiety for most men. Among your concerns is: “Will my body function normally following surgery?” Traditional open urologic surgery – in which large incisions are made to access the pelvic organs – has been the standard approach when surgery is warranted. Yet common drawbacks of this procedure include significant post-surgical pain, a lengthy recovery and an unpredictable, potentially long-term impact on continence and sexual function.

da Vinci Surgery, a minimally invasive approach that utilizes the latest in surgical and robotics technologies, is ideal for delicate urologic surgery. This includes prostatectomy, in which the target site is not only tightly confined but also surrounded by nerves affecting urinary control and sexual function.

Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy involves the surgical removal of the entire prostate and seminal vesicles in men with prostate cancer. The procedure is done primarily when there is a good likelihood the disease is confined to the prostate, with the intent of curing the cancer.
Thanks to recent advances in robotic surgical technology, robotic prostatectomy is emerging as an increasingly desirable alternative to traditional open prostate surgery. The outcomes of robotic prostatectomy appear comparable to open surgery in terms of both tumor removal and minimizing the likelihood of post-operative side effects, including impotence or incontinence. Robot-assisted prostatectomy also offers the potential for improved vision and dexterity for the surgeon during the procedure, and reduced blood loss and rapid recovery for the patient.

Robotic Surgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
da Vinci Lobectomy

If your doctor has diagnosed you with lung cancer and recommends surgery to remove a portion or a lobe of your lung, you may be a candidate for minimally invasive da Vinci® Surgery. The procedure to remove a lobe of your lung is known as a lobectomy.

Why da Vinci Surgery?

With the da Vinci System, surgeons operate through a few small incisions between your ribs – similar to other minimally invasive approaches. The da Vinci System features a magnified 3D high-definition vision system and special wristed instruments that bend and rotate far greater than the human wrist. As a result, da Vinci enables your surgeon to operate with enhanced vision, precision, dexterity and control.

As a result of da Vinci technology, da Vinci Lobectomy offers precise removal of cancerous tissue, as well as the following potential benefits compared to open surgery:  

  • Lower rate of complications
  • Less blood loss
  • Shorter hospital stay
  • Less pain
  • Fewer days with chest tube (used to drain excess fluid from the chest)
  • Improved mental quality of life soon after surgery

Resectable Lung Cancer

Our thoracic surgeon performs several different robotic procedures for State 1 and Stage 2 lung cancer, as well as for selected  cases in which the malignancy has already been treated with chemotherapy or radiation and is now considered a good candidate for surgical removal.

In robotic lung cancer surgery, the surgeons operate through small incisions in the chest to remove the tumor and a certain amount of surrounding healthy tissue from the affected lobe. (The right lung is made up three lobes, while the left lung is made up of two.) Our robotic thoracic surgeon performs several different types of lung cancer procedures, depending on the size and location of the tumor.

In a robotic wedge resection, the surgeon removes a small, wedge-shaped portion of lung, including the tumor and a certain amount of healthy tissue around it.

In a robotic sub-lobar resection, the surgeon removes a portion of the anatomic segment that has the tumor in it, as well as some normal surrounding lung.

In a robotic lobectomy, the surgeon removes the entire affected lobe (i.e., the right upper lobe).

In all three of these procedures, a robotic lymph node dissection (surgical removal of the nearby lymph nodes around the lung and mediastinum) is also performed in order to evaluate whether the cancer has progressed beyond the lungs.

In addition to the above procedures, our surgeon will also perform robotic biopsies of suspicious lung nodules, to assess whether they are malignant or benign.

Mediastinal Surgery

Robotic Surgery to Biopsy and Remove Mediastinal Tumors and Cysts

The mediastinum, the area of the chest cavity between the lungs, is a complex part of the body that contains many different types of organs and tissues, and can give rise to many types of growths, both benign and malignant. Springfield Regional currently performs robot-assisted procedures to biopsy or surgically remove a wide range of mediastinal tumors and cysts.

Robotic Procedures for Mediastinal Tumors
Tumors that our surgeons operate on robotically to either biopsy (test for cancer) or remove include thymomas (tumors of the thymus that are usually benign) — a procedure often done to treat the related neuromuscular condition myasthenia gravis — as well as teratomas (a type of encapsulated tumor). In addition, they perform robot-assisted surgery on nerve sheath tumors such as Schwannomas and neurofibromas (about 70% of which are benign), lymphomas (malignant lymphatic system cancers that include both Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s disease and are amenable to biopsy), and thyroid and parathyroid tumors, which may be benign or malignant.

Robotic Procedures for Mediastinal Cysts
Our surgeons also utilize robotic surgery to remove many types of mediastinal cysts — sacs filled with fluid or semi-solid tissue that are benign, but can sometimes cause troublesome symptoms — including cysts on the thymus, pericardial cysts (a cyst on the outer covering of the heart, which causes symptoms like chest pain in about one-third of cases), bronchogenic cysts (a congenital cyst in the respiratory system that typically manifest itself in early adulthood), and esophageal duplication cysts (another form of congenital cyst that grows on the esophagus).

da Vinci Colorectal Surgery

Colon cancer is cancer of the large intestine (colon), the lower part of your digestive system. Rectal cancer is cancer of the last several inches of the colon. Together, they're often referred to as colorectal cancers.

Most cases of colon cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called adenomatous polyps. Over time some of these polyps become colon cancers.


Polyps may be small and produce few, if any, symptoms. For this reason, doctors recommend regular screening tests to help prevent colon cancer by identifying polyps before they become colon cancer.

If you have been diagnosed with rectal cancer, your doctor may recommend surgery (known as low anterior resection). If you are facing rectal cancer surgery, ask your doctor about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery. Robotic low anterior resection (LAR) is used to surgically treat tumors in the upper part of the rectum, where it joins the colon. In this procedure, part or all of the rectum is removed and the colon is then surgically reattached to the remaining rectum or anus.

If your doctor recommends surgery to treat a colorectal condition, you may be a candidate for minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery. Using state-of-the-art technology, the da Vinci System enables doctors to perform delicate and complex operations through a few tiny incisions with breakthrough vision, precision, dexterity and control.


Kidney Disorders and Kidney Cancer:

da Vinci Partial Nephrectomy

Kidney-Sparing Surgery

If your doctor recommends surgery for a kidney disease such as kidney cancer, ask about da Vinci Surgery. Depending on your disease state and tumor location, you may not have to lose your entire kidney to surgery. This surgical technique is called partial nephrectomy or kidney-sparing surgery. The goal is to remove only the diseased part of your kidney sparing the healthy, functioning kidney tissue.

Sparing kidney tissue is important because studies show that patients who have their entire kidney removed are more likely to suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD) after surgery and need dialysis compared to patients who received a kidney-sparing partial nephrectomy.

Why da Vinci Surgery?

Instead of a large incision used in open surgery, da Vinci surgeons make a few small incisions - similar to traditional laparoscopy. The da Vinci System features a magnified 3D high-definition vision system and special wristed instruments that bend and rotate far greater than the human wrist. As a result, da Vinci enables your doctor to operate with enhanced vision, precision, dexterity and control.

As a result of da Vinci technology, da Vinci Partial Nephrectomy offers the following potential benefits:

  • Precise tumor removal and kidney reconstruction
  • Excellent chance of preserving the kidney, where indicated
  • Low rate of operative complications
  • Short hospital stay

As a result of da Vinci technology, da Vinci Partial Nephrectomy offers the following potential benefits when compared to traditional laparoscopy:

  • Shorter operation
  • Shorter warm ischemic time (shorter is better for kidney function)
  • Less blood loss
  • Shorter hospital stay

da Vinci for Kidney Conditions

If your doctor recommends surgery for a kidney condition, you may be a candidate for a new, minimally invasive approach — da Vinci Surgery.

The kidneys are two small organs located behind the abdomen, on each side of the spine. By producing urine, kidneys remove toxic by-products and excess fluids from the body, which helps maintain a critical balance of salt, potassium and acid.

A common condition affecting the kidneys is blockage of the ureters, the tubes that transport urine from the kidneys to the bladder. Blockages of the ureters can be present from birth or acquired through illness or injury, and can create serious side effects like infections and kidney stones. If left untreated, blockages can cause chronic pain and may damage the kidney over time.

Cancer, a second condition affecting the kidneys, can form in the small tubes inside the kidney, which are used for filtering blood, and in the center of the kidney where urine collects.

Treatment Options

A non-cancerous kidney condition involving a blockage can usually be treated by removing it; depending on the type of blockage, surgery may be used. Kidney cancer, on the other hand, is relatively resistant to radiation and chemotherapy.

As a result, the gold standard treatment for localized kidney cancer is removal of the kidney or kidney tumors. Kidney surgery is traditionally performed using an open approach, which requires a large abdominal incision. Another approach, conventional laparoscopy, is less invasive, but limits the doctor's dexterity, visualization and control, compared to open surgery.

Women's Health Procedure's Cancer Related Surgery Procedures General Surgery Procedures