Sports Medicine in the News

Burt Roger shares tips for runners preparing for the upcoming Mercy Health Glass City Marathon:
http://www.wtol.com/clip/12238166/preparing-for-the-mercy-glass-city-marathon

"The Consequences of Concussions"
Burton L. Rogers, Jr. ED.D, MBA, ATC, PTA, Regional Administrative Director, Mercy Sports Medicine was interviewed for the December 14, 2014 edition of The Blade:
http://www.toledoblade.com/local/2014/12/14/Tragic-death-of-Ohio-State-athlete-puts-focus-on-consequences-of-concussions.html

Strain vs. Sprain.  What's the Difference? Burton L. Rogers, Jr. ED.D, MBA, ATC, PTA, Regional Administrative Director, Mercy Sports Medicine explains the difference in the October 29, 2014 edition of The Perrysburg Messenger Journal:
http://etypeservices.com/SWF/LocalUser/Welch1//Magazine67741/Full/index.aspx?id=67741#/12/

Mercy Sports Medicine sports injury clinics help get athletes back to play
Mercy Messenger, October 2014

As student athletes throughout the area head back to school and onto the field, Mercy will be with them on the sidelines to ensure they remain healthy and active. From August through November, Mercy Sports Medicine offers a sports injury clinic every Saturday morning at Mercy St. Anne Hospital. The clinic is open to all athletes including junior and senior high school, collegiate and ‘weekend warriors’. To date, the clinic sees about 15 athletes each Saturday. Mercy Defiance Clinic Sports Medicine will also be offering a clinic on weekdays through May 22, 2015 and on Saturdays through Oct. 30.
 
The comprehensive clinics include an evaluation and diagnostic imaging, if necessary. All test results are
reviewed by a sports medicine physician and a care plan, tailored to the athlete, is created.
 
“At any level of sports, when an injury occurs, the most efficient way for an early and safe return is through early intervention. Our Saturday morning athlete’s clinic, commonly called “The Bump Clinic” is open to all athletes,” said Burton L. Rogers, Jr., Ed.D, MBA, ATC, PTA, regional administrator for Mercy Sports Medicine. “This program allows for athletes to be seen less than 12 hours after a Friday night injury. This ensures the athlete will be evaluated and a plan of care developed. Therefore, by noon, the player, the family and the athlete’s coach have an idea about playing status.”
 
Dr. Rogers added that while there is a physical benefit to quick determination, there are psychological benefits, too. Mercy’s Sports Medicine Program now offers services to about 30 schools and sports clubs in the Metro area. The program is designed to enhance the quality and accessibility of medical care to all athletes in our region. Dr. Rogers and Mercy Sports Medicine team members serve in a role similar to a patient navigator in that they help connect injured athletes quickly with the services they need. Services include evaluation and treatment for all musculoskeletal related injuries and conditions and rehabilitative services.
 
The team of specialists also will help coordinate access to care for athletes and physically active people of all ages; facilitate rapid and comprehensive treatment; and provide expert management when procedures are required.
 
In addition, Mercy Sports Medicine offers physical therapy and athletic training services on Sunday mornings at Sunforest Court. With many athletes, this quick intervention allows for an earlier and safe return to play.
 
Mercy Sports Medicine gets injured athlete ‘Back to Play’
Mercy Messenger, November 2014

Many athletes throughout the area have been playing sports since the start of this school year. Some have been fortunate to escape the season without injury, while others have not been as lucky.

The Mercy Sports Medicine Injury Clinic has been taking place every Saturday morning August through November at Mercy St. Anne Hospital, caring for those that have been injured with the goal to get them ‘back to play’ as soon as possible.
 
Keith S., II, a 16-year-old student at Central Catholic High School has experienced the Mercy Sports Medicine Injury Clinic first hand.
 
Midway through September, Keith pulled his right labor (shoulder) in practice. Keith was immediately seen at the Mercy Sports Injury Clinic where he ended up undergoing physical therapy for four weeks. Keith sat out from football for just two weeks and was then back to play with a shoulder brace while he continued his final two weeks of therapy.
 
“We didn’t know things would move as quickly as they did,” said Renetta S., Keith’s mom. “We were so happy to get in. The appointments were scheduled so Keith did not have to miss school and I did not have to miss work.” The family expressed what a good experience they had. Keith enjoyed his time, specifically with Burton L. Rogers, Jr., Ed.D, MBA, ATC, PT, regional administrator for Mercy Sports Medicine, who gave the teen a “real work-out on his shoulder,” according to Keith.
 
“Keith talked about Dr. Rogers and how impressed he was with the way he worked on his shoulder. Keith
felt — each visit — that it was what he needed and things started feeling better right away,” Renetta said. “Each time I would pick Keith up from therapy he would talk about how comfortable he was with Dr. Rogers and how impressed he was with how much Dr. Rogers knew what he was doing.”
 
Mercy Sports Medicine Program now offers services to about 30 schools and sports clubs in the Metro area. The program is designed to enhance the quality and accessibility of medical care to all athletes in our region. The team of specialists will help coordinate access to care for athletes and physically active people of all ages; facilitate rapid and comprehensive treatment; and provide expert management when procedures are required. “Dr. Rogers is a special guy and we are grateful for all of his help and expertise,” Renetta said.