Anal Fissure

An anal fissure is a small tear in the lining of the lower rectum that can cause pain during bowel movements. It is caused by injury or trauma to the anal canal, most often from passing a large stool. Typically anal fissures will heal with home treatments, but if it does not heal after eight weeks, it may require medical treatment.

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Anal Fistula

The majority of anal fistulas occur when one of the glands, located just inside the anus, become blocked and an abscess forms then develops into a fistula. A smaller percent of anal fistulas can be caused by diverticulitis, Crohn’s disease, trauma, cancer, or sexually transmitted diseases. Symptoms of an anal fistula include pain during bowel movements and around the anus, blood and pus draining from around the anal opening, recurrent anal abscesses, fever and fatigue. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, contact your physician.

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Colorectal Polyp

A colorectal polyp, or colon polyp, is a clump of cells that forms on the lining of the colon. While most polyps are harmless, some can develop into cancer overtime. Some individuals may never know they have colorectal polyps, while others have symptoms including rectal bleeding, bloody stool, constipation or diarrhea, pain or anemia. Regular colonoscopies when you are over 50 will help prevent polyps from developing into cancer.

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Crohn's Disease

Crohn’s disease is an chronic inflammatory bowel disease causing inflammation to occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, most commonly at the end of the small intestine. Crohn’s can cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia and fatigue. While there is currently no cure for Crohn’s disease, medications can slow down the progression of the disease and lessen the side effects. It is important for people with Crohn’s disease to manage this disease closely with their doctor and receive regular screenings for colorectal cancer due to their heightened risk.

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Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis occurs when infected pouches form in the wall of the colon. While the exact cause of diverticulitis is unknown, a low-fiber diet is thought to play a part in the development of this disease. Diverticulitis can cause extreme pain, typically in the lower left side of the abdominal region and worsen with movement. Bloating, gas, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite and fever may all occur with diverticulitis. Treatment for diverticulitis is customized based on the severity of the disease and may include antibiotic medication, changes in diet, and potentially surgery. Prompt treatment of diverticulitis often provides relief within 2 to 3 days.

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Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in and around your anus and lower rectum. They are very common and one of the most likely causes for blood in your stool as a result of straining during a bowel movement. Typically hemorrhoids are not serious, but a doctor’s visit is recommended to ensure it is not a more serious condition. Mild cases resolve with home treatments and lifestyle modifications. In severe cases, doctors can prescribe medication or surgery.

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Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease that causes ulcers and inflammation in the colon and rectum. The disease ranges from mild to severe and the cause is unknown. Symptoms of ulcerative colitis include bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping, abdominal pain and rectal bleeding. Treatment recommendations vary by the severity of the disease but often include diet changes, medication, and sometimes even surgery.

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