Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is an endoscopic exam, during which a long, flexible tube is inserted into the rectum. The tube allows your doctor to view the inside of the colon, and if needed, remove polyps or abnormal tissue. Also called a coloscopy, the exam can help identify problems in the intestine, like abdominal pain or blood in stool, and screen for colon cancer. If you’re age 50 or older, your doctor may recommend a colonoscopy every 10 years, or sometimes more frequently.

Learn More

Fistulotomy

Fistulotomy is surgical procedure used to relieve an anal fistula by opening it. It is an outpatient procedure that typically takes around an hour. Full recovery from a fistulotomy can take 3-12 weeks but the first week is the most restrictive and includes rest, avoiding strenuous activities, keeping the would clean to allow it to heal from the inside out. It is normal to experience some cramping and pain following the procedure and your doctor may provide a stool softener to help ease any discomfort.

Learn More

Hemorrhoid Banding

Rubber band ligation, or hemorrhoid banding, is an in-office procedure performed by a doctor to treat internal hemorrhoids.

Learn More

Hemorrhoidectomy

A hemorrhoidectomy is the surgical removal of severe internal and external hemorrhoids. During the surgery, a doctor will close the swollen vein and remove the hemorrhoids with a scalpel, cauterization tool or laser. Hemorrhoidectomies are typically performed outpatient and do not require a hospital stay.

Learn More

Lateral Internal Sphincterotomy

A lateral internal sphincterotomy is an operation used to treat chronic anal fissures. This procedure helps improve blood supply and heals fissures by lowering the resting pressure of the internal anal sphincter. It is a minor operation performed under local or general anesthesia and does not require an extended hospital stay for recovery. Common side effect are trouble controlling flatulence and fecal incontinence immediately following the surgery.

Learn More

Partial Colectomy

A partial colectomy, also commonly referred to as a bowel resection, is a major surgery to remove a part of the bowel. During a partial colectomy, a surgeon will detach a patient’s large intestine from their surrounding organs and tissues, remove the diseased part of the bowel, and then reconnect the healthy ends of the intestine. Partial colectomies are recommended to remove the damaged part of the bowel caused by cancer, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis, blockage or severe bleeding.

Learn More

Polypectomy

The removal of a polyp from inside the colon is referred to as a polypectomy. Polypectomies are non-invasive and usually done during a colonoscopy if a polyp is found. For smaller polyps, a snare polypectomy is utilized to cut the polyp out with a thin wire and then cauterizing the spot where the polyp was found. For larger polyps or polyps located in more challenging spots, endoscopic resection techniques can be utilized by injecting the polyp with fluid and removing the polyp all in one piece. Once the polyp is removed during a polypectomy, it is sent to a lab to test the cells.

Learn More

Rectal Exam (DRE)

A rectal exam, also called digital rectal exam or DRE, is a physical exam in which a doctor inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to feel for growths or abnormalities. Rectal exams are performed on both men and women to check on several symptoms, including blood in stool, pelvic pain or change in urination or bowel movements.

Learn More

Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy is a treatment blood vessels where medicine is injected into the vessels, causing them to shrink. It is commonly used to treat hemorrhoids by injecting the solution into the hemorrhoid tissue to cut off blood flow. This will cause the hemorrhoid to scar and shrink and eventually fall off. For some cases, this may need to be repeated every few weeks until the hemorrhoids are completely gone.

Learn More

Total Colectomy

A total colectomy is a major surgery to remove the entire large intestine and connect the small intestine to the rectum. With a total colectomy patients should expect to receiving inpatient care for 3 to 7 days, but will recover fully over time and be able to participate normal activities. Total colectomies are recommended to remove damaged bowels caused by cancer, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis, blockage or severe bleeding.

Learn More