Achalasia

Achalasia is a disorder that occurs when the nerves that connect your mouth and stomach become damaged. This makes it difficult for food and liquid to pass through your stomach, resulting in symptoms that include chest pain, difficulty swallowing and regurgitation. While there isn’t a cure for achalasia, minimally invasive therapies and surgeries can make it more manageable.

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Barrett's Esophagus

Barrett’s esophagus is a common disorder among people with long-term gastroesophageal reflex disease, also known as GERD. This occurs when the usual tissue that lines the esophagus becomes tissue that more closely resembles tissue of the small intestine. A result of repeated exposure to stomach acid, Barrett’s esophagus most commons symptoms are heartburn and chest pain.

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Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilis esophagitis is a chronic immune system disease that occurs when eosinophils, a type of white blood cells, build up in the esophagus. This buildup damages tissue, which often results in difficulty swallowing. Additional symptoms include chest or upper abdominal pain, persistent heartburn and no response to GERD medication.

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Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

If you experience heartburn or acid reflux more than twice a week, you may have GERD. The classic symptom of GERD is burning chest pain that occurs after eating and becomes worse while lying down. This happens when stomach acid or bile flow into the food pipe and irritate the lining. In most cases, GERD can be managed with lifestyle changes and over-the-counter medicine. In severe cases, stronger medicine and surgery are available.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a digestive diseases disorder that affects the large intestine of the digestive track that is characterized by chronic abdominal symptoms.

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Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth usually occurs as a result of diseases or conditions in the intestines that hinder the body from absorbing proper nutrients. This can lead to vitamin deficiencies and malnutrition, and cause indigestion, abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea or loose stools. Also known as small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome, SIBO is best treated with antibiotics, in which routine cycles may be required.

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