Tachycardia Arrhythmia (Fast Heartbeat)

Tachycardia arrhythmia, also referred to as tachycardia, is an abnormally fast heartbeat of more than 100 beats a minute.

Learn More

Angina (Chest Pain)

When your heart does not get enough oxygen-rich blood, you may experience chest pain called angina. Angina feels like pressure or squeezing in the chest, shoulders, arms, neck, jaw or back. In some people angina can feel like heartburn or indigestion.

Learn More

Aortic Valve Regurgitation

Aortic valve regurgitation occurs when your aortic valve doesn’t close securely and blood flows back into the left ventricle (the main pumping chamber).

Learn More

Aortic Valve Stenosis (Aortic Stenosis)

Aortic valve stenosis, aortic stenosis, is the abnormal narrowing of the aortic valve that makes it harder to pump blood to the body. This can cause the heart to weaken and may eventually lead to heart failure as the aortic stenosis progresses.

Learn More

Atrial Fibrillation (AFib)

Atrial fibrillation, also known as AFib or AF, is a tachycardia arrhythmia that occurs when the atria (upper chambers of the heart) do not beat properly causing an irregular heartbeat.

Learn More

Atrial Flutter

Atrial flutter is an abnormal heart rhythm that occurs when the atria (upper chambers of the heart) beats excessively (250-300 beats per minute) and can’t pump blood effectively.

Learn More

Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)

An atrial septal defect is a congenital heart defect that occurs when the wall (interatrial septum) that divides the upper chambers of the heart is defective or absent causing oxygen-rich blood to combine with oxygen-poor blood.

Learn More

Bradycardia Arrhythmia (Slow Heartbeat)

Bradycardia arrhythmia, also known as bradycardia, is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. Slow heart rates can be considered normal in highly athletic, healthy people.

Learn More

Coarctation of the Aorta

Coarctaction of the aorta is a congenital heart defect where the aorta, the main artery that carries blood to the body from the heart, is narrowed. The narrowing in the aorta forces the body to work harder to pump blood to the lower body.

Learn More

Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is a disease of the heart muscle. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a cardiac condition where the heart’s left ventricle (the main pumping chamber of the heart) is enlarged or weakened, which decreases the amount of blood the heart can pump.

Learn More

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when the blood flow to the heart muscle is blocked and the heart can’t get oxygen. Heart muscle can begin to die if the blood flow is not restored in a timely manner.

Learn More

Heart Failure

Heart failure is a condition where the heart does not pump effectively causing symptoms because the heart does not meet the body’s oxygen needs. There are two types of heart failure — systolic heart failure and diastolic heart failure.

Learn More

Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

Hypertension, high blood pressure, occurs when the force of the blood pushing against the blood vessel walls is consistently high. Stage one hypertension is any blood pressure reading over 130/80 but under 140/90.

Learn More

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs when the heart muscle cells enlarge and cause the ventricle walls to enlarge. The cause of the ventricular wall thickening is unknown and microscopic examination of the heart muscle is abnormal.

Learn More

Long QT Syndrome (LQTS)

Long QT syndrome is a rare heart rhythm condition when the QT interval, the amount of time it takes for the heart to contract, recover and to contract again, takes longer than normal. It can cause a form of tachycardia that can be life-threatening.

Learn More

Hypotension (Low Blood Pressure)

Hypotension is abnormally low blood pressure (lower than 90/60 mm Hg). If your blood pressure gets too low, it can cause dizziness, fainting or death.

Learn More

Mitral Valve Regurgitation

Mitral valve regurgitation occurs when blood leaks backward through the mitral valve as the left ventricle contracts. When this happens, blood can flow both in and out of the ventricle and atrium during a contraction.

Learn More

Mitral Valve Stenosis (Mitral Stenosis)

Mitral valve stenosis (mitral stenosis) occurs when the mitral valve opening, located between the atrium (upper chamber) and ventricle (lower chamber) on the left side of the heart, is narrowed and only a small amount of blood can flow through it.

Learn More

Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA)

Patent ductus arteriosus is a congenital heart defect that occurs when the ductus arteriosus, the blood vessel that connects the aorta and pulmonary arteries, does not close after birth adding strain to the heart and arteries in the lungs.

Learn More

Pericarditis

Pericarditis is inflammation of the pericardial sac (lining around the heart). Pericarditis feels like sharp, stabbing chest pain in the left or middle of the chest that usually comes on quickly.

Learn More

Pulmonary Embolism (PE)

A pulmonary embolism occurs when the pulmonary artery becomes blocked and the blood supply to the lungs is cut off. It's typically caused by a blood clot that has broken off from the vessels in the legs or other parts of the body and travels to the lungs.

Learn More

Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation

Pulmonary valve regurgitation, also known as pulmonic regurgitation, is a leaky pulmonary valve (the valve that controls the flow of blood from the heart to the lungs). Pulmonary regurgitation is very common and can affect up to 90% of the population.

Learn More

Pulmonary Valve Stenosis (Pulmonary Stenosis)

Pulmonary valve stenosis is a heart condition affecting the pulmonary valve, the valve that moves the blood from the heart to the lungs, that develops before birth. The condition occurs when the pulmonary valve does not fully open.

Learn More

Syncope (Fainting)

Syncope, commonly referred to as fainting, is a common medical condition characterized by temporary loss of consciousness. It typically occurs as a symptom of underlying heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, bradycardia or atrial fibrillation.

Learn More

Tricuspid Valve Regurgitation

Tricuspid regurgitation is leakage of blood backwards through the tricuspid valve when the right ventricle contracts. It is triggered by an enlarged right heart chamber or because of left valve problems that strain the entire heart.

Learn More

Tricuspid Valve Stenosis (Tricuspid Stenosis)

Tricuspid valve stenosis (tricuspid stenosis) is narrowing in the heart’s tricuspid valve located between the right atrium and right ventricle. It prevents blood flow from returning into the right atrium from the right ventricle. 

Learn More

Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

A ventricular septal defect is a hole in the wall between the heart’s ventricles (lower chambers). Ventricular heart defects affect approximately one in every 500 babies born in the United States and account for 30% of congenital heart defects.

Learn More

Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a rare heart condition that occurs when an extra electrical pathway in the heart causes an abnormally fast heart rate. 

Learn More