Bladder Prolapse

Several muscles and ligaments in your pelvis support your bladder and keep it in place. Stress from having a baby, lifting heavy things or being overweight can weaken those supports. When these muscles get too weak, they can’t support the bladder and it drops down and bulges into the vagina. Signs of bladder prolapse include a full feeling or pressure in your pelvis, feeling pain when you cough or lift, frequent bladder infections and pain during sex.

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Erectile Dysfunction

Up to 30 million men experience erectile dysfunction (ED). Men with ED can’t get or keep an erection more than half the time they want to have sex. Treatment options include counseling to help deal with stress or anxiety that may be causing ED, pumps that help increase blood flow to the penis, medications to make it easier to get and keep an erection and surgery or implants to help you get an erection.

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Kidney Failure

Kidney failure happens when your kidneys can't filter the waste from your blood. As a result, dangerous levels of substances like potassium build up in the blood. It can be caused by injuries or diseases like diabetes or high blood pressure, which damage the kidneys over time. Symptoms may include going to the bathroom more frequently, feeling like you can't catch your breath, chest pain or discomfort and swollen legs, feet or ankles.

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Kidney Infection

Kidney infections happen when bacteria travels through your urinary tract into your kidneys. Kidney infections can happen in anyone, but women are more at risk. Symptoms include burning or pain when urinating, pain in your groin, side or back, blood in your urine, urine that smells bad, fever, chills, nausea and vomiting.

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Peyronie's Disease

Peyronie’s disease is caused by a buildup of scar tissue inside the penis. This scar tissue causes a curvature when the penis becomes erect. Although a curved erection isn’t abnormal, it may cause pain. It can also cause erectile difficulties. Doctors aren’t sure what causes it. In some cases, a man may have a history of injury. Mild cases don’t usually need treatment. In severe cases, doctors prescribe medication or surgery.

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Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction

A ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction occurs where there is a blockage in one of the ureters, the tube that brings urine from the kidney to the bladder. The blockage causes a backup of urine that can result in kidney damage. UPJ is most often diagnosed in children born with a blockage, but can also occur in children and adults with scar tissue. UPJ obstruction that affects kidney function is treated with surgery.

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Vaginal Atrophy

Vaginal atrophy happens when the tissues in the vagina start thinning out. It can make having sex painful. Other symptoms include dryness, itching and bleeding. Hormone changes during menopause, while breastfeeding or after having a baby are the main causes. These changes thin the lining of the vagina, making it drier and more fragile. It's a common condition but doesn't affect everyone. Regular sexual activity can help prevent this condition.

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Vaginal Dryness

Your body naturally creates a clear fluid that keeps the tissues in your vagina stretchy and healthy. A drop in hormone levels often causes your body to make less of that fluid. This change in hormones is common during and after menopause. Dryness can happen to women of all ages but it’s most common in older women. Doctors often treat it with hormone therapy or over-the-counter products.

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Varicoceles

Varicoceles are veins inside a man’s scrotum that are bigger than normal. They often form while you're young and they grow larger over time. Most men have no symptoms, but sometimes the vein can cause pain. This pain might worsen as the day progresses, improve when you're lying on your back and worsen after standing for a long time. Treatment is typically not required for varicoceles.

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